Even though the WOCMES Seville 2018 organisers strongly encourage the submission of closed panels, the open panel option is available to those wishing to organise a panel but not having the compulsory 4 paper presenters or wishing to invite other potential paper presenters.

This space offers the opportunity to advertise open panel proposals or join an existing open panel. If that is your case, please submit your proposal to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The WOCMES Seville 2018 Secretariat will post all the information received in this space so that institutions and/or individuals can contact the panel advertiser.

Proposals

42

The negative image of the ‘Arab Other’ or ‘Arabophobia’ emerged in recent centuries among a minority of otherwise enlightened Iranian thinkers, whose views are shaped by Western interpretations, leading them to blame Arabs for the failure of Iran compared to Western countries.

During the modern era, this thinking led some Iranian intellectuals to embrace Western nationalist ideals, which assert that the curbing of religion, as well as customs and traditions, is the primary reason for any nation’s decline.
As a result of this thinking, many Iranians in the last century embraced the ‘European Romanticism’ ideal, leading to an era of intellectual renaissance which was the origin of the Iranian nationalism that instilled a patriotic and xenophobic fervor for the supposed supremacy of Iranian ethnicity, culture, customs and superstitions and a consequent disdain for the perceived inferiority of others.

This supremacist nationalistic ideology led inevitably to a struggle between what its advocates view as the superior historic Iranian ethos and the inferior Arab and Islamic ‘Other’. Add to this that evaluating pre-Islamic Iran became possible only in the third period of the 19th century, at which stage Iranian intellectuals overlooked the western literary and intellectual products and began to realize that they owned a history that could form the foundation for their new nationalistic and intellectual orientations.

The topics of interest include, but are not restricted to, the following issues:
1- Oriental School and revival of Iranian Nationalism.
2- Construing and reconstructing the Iranian Identity.
3- The rol of "Arab Other" in shaping the Iranian Identity.

Please submit your abstracts (250-300 words) before March 15th, 2018 to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Acceptance notices will be sent within a week and participants will be asked to submit their full papers no later than April 30th, 2018.

The Panel will be chaired by Mohammed S. Alsulami, CEO of Rasanah: International Institute for Iranian Studies (IIIS)

Please contact the following administrator for further information:
Mohammad Sari Mohammad Alzou'bi
Western Affairs Research and Outreach Director
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Whats App: 00962797786802
Phone Num: 00966593532327

41

Amazigh Cinema at Large: Challenges and Hopes

Amazigh/Berber identity is made of a diverse cultural and linguistic heritage covering area from the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean to Siwa Oasis in Egypt, and encompassing sub-Saharan Africa and the vast European and American diasporas. Transnational in nature, yet profoundly marked by local and national boundaries, languages, and histories, Amazigh narratives in film present a compelling, contemporary approach to the human condition that the poet Nabil Fares deftly describes as “the universal –or the local without the walls.”

This panel seeks to engage a discussion of cultural production across the Amazigh space and encourage a diversity of perspectives and theoretical lenses. The aim of the panel is also to analyze Amazigh transnational identities as they are reflected in film, and to develop an overview of Amazigh cinema by identifying the elements that constitute an Amazigh film.

The panel seeks participants who wish to examine:

The essence of the Amazigh film
National and international Amazigh festivals
Formal and informal networks of distribution
Diasporic filmmakers and audiences
Promoting (trans)national cinema
The deadline for the submission of paper abstracts to the panel organizer: February 28th, 2018
Habiba Boumlik, Associate Professor, City University of New York, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


40

Higher Education in Tunisia and beyond: Status quo and reform opportunities

The free access to higher education has for a long time been the main factor for social mobility in Tunisia and has thus played a key role in the development of Tunisian society since independence. From today's perspective, this system seems in dire need for reform as it is no longer able to fulfil its role as indicated amongst others by the high unemployment rate of university graduates.

While on the one side, the university seems no longer able to contribute to the creation of a fairer society, it is simultaneously confronted by attempts of instrumentalization that seriously threaten academic freedom and the independence of universities. These attempts were frequent during the period of dictatorship, but have not stopped after 2011. The violent events of Manouba in 2012 are probably the most indicative of these attempts. In sum, one can say that Tunisian universities are confronted by a plethora of problems coming both from within and outside these institutions.

In 2014, the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation started its program "Independent Universities and the Promotion of Critical Research and Teaching". We have been engaging with critical academics from Tunisia and Germany mainly in the fields of humanities, social sciences, law and economics and encouraging exchange and cooperation between them. At the same time, we have been cooperating with actors defending academic freedom.

We invite papers discussing the state of higher education in Tunisia in its various aspects and from different disciplinary backgrounds. We are also highly interested in comparisons between Tunisia and other countries and particularly other North African countries.

Please submit your abstracts (250-300 words) before March 15th, 2018 to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Acceptance notices will be sent within a week and participants will be asked to submit their full papers no later than April 30th, 2018.


39

Title : North Africa during the First World War

Contact : Assoc. Prof. Odile Moreau (Montpellier 3 U., IMAF/Paris-Sorbonne, Paris 1)

This panel will bring together scholars to present their work in progress on North Africa during the First World War. In addition to the participation to French war effort, North Africa itself was a vast space involved in the First World War, a place of confrontation and sometime of clashes.

Aiming at outreaching eurocentrism, our papers are addressing a double challenge: to reintegrate North Africa in the course of the First World War and to conceptualise its participation at a broader scale than its involvement in the battlefield on the European continent.

This panel welcomes papers dealing with :

- Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt during WWI
- Racial and colonial aspects of WWI in North Africa
- The conflicting and evolving attitudes of Muslims during WWI
- The dilemna faced as Muslims within colonial regimes who were confronted by conflicting loyalties
- WWI as a time of identity construction, reconstruction and deconstruction
- War experience of Muslims individuals
- Interactions in North Africa between international and local actors
- New aspects of Mediterranean social cultural history and politics

The deadline for submission of proposals and abstracts, which should be no more than 250 words, is February 10, 2018. The proposals should include the paper title, the abstract, the institutionnal affiliation and contact information. According to the accepted papers we will organize a single panel (4 papers) or a double panel (8 papers). You will be informed of the result by February 18, 2018.

All proposals should be sent to : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

38

The Staging of Politics in the MENA region

Contact: Dr. Charlotte Joppien,

Türkei Europa Zentrum, Hamburg University / Landeszentrale für politische Bildung, Hamburg

We invite applications investigating the staging of politics in the MENA region (including Turkey and Iran) in the 20th and 21th century. Submissions may deal with a particular moment in time, take a historic comparative perspective or compare between different countries. Submissions should centre around one of the three core themes:

a) political actors and/or their ‘enemies’ (e.g. hero and villain, personal vs. institutional politics, questions of the human body/embodiment),
b) the staging of politics from an aesthetic-technical point of view (e.g. questions of aesthetic production, symbols, political ritual, architecture, sculptures, or materials and colours) or
c) narratives (with regard to main themes, their political use and interpretation and relation to the audience)

We invite applications from a wide disciplinary background including e.g. anthropology, art history, communication and media studies, history, political studies, sociology, theatre studies and alike. Submissions should be sent in until February, 20th. Abstracts should have a summary of around 300 words as well as name, title and institution of the applicant and be submitted by email in word format to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

37

Titre: Les élites en méditerranée à travers le temps et l'espace.

Cordonnés :
Sami BENKHERFALLAH
Doctorant en Histoire & Archéologie
Université de Poitiers
Centre d'études supérieures de civilisation médiévale
CESCM - UMR7302
Hôtel Berthelot
24 rue de la Chaîne E13
TSA 81118
86073 Poitiers cedex 9
Tel.: 06.69.49.14.83
e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Abstract
Recherches passées et questionnements nouveaux sur les élites d'hier et d'aujourd'hui en méditerranée.
- Qu'est ce que l'on entend par "Élite" et ceux qui la compose ?
- Définition de la notion d'élite, et par défaut de son contraire.
- La nature de ces élites = Élites politiques ? Élites militaires ? Élites marchandes ? Élites religieuses ? Élites civiles ? etc.
- Étude comparative temporelle : De l'antiquité à aujourd'hui.
- Étude comparative spaciale : En méditerranée et au-delà (Du Maghreb à l'Indus, Europe)
- Étude croisée entre le temps et l'espace.
- Études de cas

Cette étude se veut être une approche pluridisciplinaire: Sciences historiques, sciences humaines et sociales, sciences politiques, sciences religieuses, sciences économiques, sciences islamiques etc.
Si vous êtes intéressé en participer, s’il vous plait de contacté avant le 20 février 2018.


36

Title: Youth in the New Turkey

Contact: Prof. Aydin Ozipek. Northwestern University

The proposed panel invites papers addressing the contemporary youth cultural practices in Turkey. In recent years, young people figured prominently in various major political events such as the Gezi Park Uprising. They have also been targets of governmental interventions such as the AKP’s controversial program to cultivate a ‘pious generation,’ as well as numerous changes to the education system and the curricula. In a country that prides itself as having the youngest population in Europe, high rates of youth unemployment and poverty in a time of extreme political and economic uncertainty make it all the more challenging to attain social adulthood.

The panel seeks to bring together original papers addressing various aspects of contemporary youth culture in Turkey. Potential topics for a productive discussion around the general theme of youth in Turkey include, but not limited to: the Turkish state, temporality, gender, militarism, political activism, citizenship, education, popular culture, consumption, and cultural production.

The deadline for the submission of proposals and abstracts, which should be no more than 250 words, is March 15, 2018.

You will be informed of the result by April 15, 2018

Abstracts can be submitted by email in Word format. Submissions should be emailed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


35

Open panel: Cultural producers and the politicization of culture in civil wars

Organizer: Candice Raymond, ERC Social Dynamics of Civil Wars (Pantheon-Sorbonne University)

Our panel invites papers addressing the effects of civil wars on cultural fields and practices through historical, cultural or political sociology approach. The papers can deal with various domains of cultural production, whether they are related to arts, literature, or sciences. Also, a particular focus will be made on politicization processes affecting these fields in wartime.

In the wake of the “Arab Spring”, scholarship has shown a renewed interest in cultural production and producers in time of political crisis. As for civil wars, culture is often considered a minor preoccupation. Whereas in many cases culture actually becomes a parallel arena for political conflict and symbolic warfare, especially when ideologies and identities are highly mobilized within the conflict. However, political cleavages are not enough to understand what is actually happening on the “cultural front”. Proper literary, artistic or academic rationale are also at play in wartime, even though they are themselves deeply affected by the civil war.

Civil wars should be understood as rather more complex historical processes than short-term political crises; in which critical episodes are followed by stabilization phases and by the emergence of new routines in wartime. Moreover, temporary withdrawal of state control over certain territories gives room for insurgent organizations to co-opt public institutions or create their own apparatuses. In addition, wartime displacements and migrations as well as interventions from international organizations have deep effects on the social make-up of cultural fields. All these elements produce structural change of the cultural fields and in their relation to politics that this panel intends to grasp.

How do civil wars impact the social conditions of cultural production? What are the mechanisms leading to the politicization of cultural institutions and practices? Does this necessarily entail a loss of autonomy for cultural producers and/or fields? How do civil war contexts modify the relative value and conversion mechanisms of the social, political and symbolic capitals held by cultural actors?

This panel welcomes papers dealing with:

- Conflict dynamics and political divisions splitting up cultural fields during civil wars
- Wartime institutional transformations and their impacts on the social make-up and functioning of cultural fields, especially in their relation to the political field
- Transnationalization of cultural fields in civil war contexts
- Political commitment of cultural producers or defection rationale at play during civil wars
- Biographical trajectories of cultural producers, to illustrate structural constraints and capital conversions in wartime

Papers based on fieldwork or archival research are particularly welcome. We also accept papers coming from different disciplines. Papers could be in English or French.

Authors are asked to submit a proposal that must include a paper title, abstract (150 words), their institutional affiliation and contact information. Depending on the number of accepted papers, we will propose either a single panel (with four participants) or a double one. The deadline for the submission is January, 31st 2018.

All proposals should be sent to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This panel is organized by the ERC program Social Dynamics of Civil Wars (Pantheon-Sorbonne University).


34

Panel on vertical and horizontal social differences in Iran

The Islamic Revolution of 1979 in Iran was driven by an egalitarian ideology elaborated by the post-colonial sociologist and activist Ali Shariati (1933-1977). This ideology was drawn upon by the leaders of the revolution to mobilize the Iranian “mostaz’afin” (the oppressed) against the monarchic regime that they depicted as “mostakberin” (the arrogant/the oppressor).
Whilst the 1980s were characterized by somewhat egalitarian ideals and policies, with the rise of neo-liberalism in the 1990s and the restoration of the “rentier state” (Skocpol 1982) new forms of vertical social differences have emerged (Farzanegan & Alaedini 2017; Maljoo 2017; Nomani & Behdad 2008). Moreover, the new ideological orientation of the state has reshuffled the horizontal social differences – for instance along milieu, gender, ethnicity, faith etc. (Elling 2013; Majbouri & Fesharaki 2017; Mir-Hosseini 2017; Tohidi 2009).
The panel addresses social differences in post-revolutionary Iran in the broadest sense of the term including, on one hand, its objective dimension (social stratification, habitus, social mobility, poverty etc.) and, on the other hand, its subjective dimension (perception of, and attitudes toward, inequalities, identity demarcation of social groups etc.).
Scholars of Iranian studies who address in their research vertical or horizontal social differences in some way or another are requested to submit an abstract of maximum 250 words, their institutional affiliation and contact information to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The topics of interest include, but are not restricted to, the following issues:
• Social stratification
• Income distribution
• Social mobility
• Perception of, and/or attitudes toward, social differences
• Habitus and strategies of social distinction
• Strategies of identity demarcation of social groups
• Intra- and intergroup social differences
• Ethnic and religious minorities
• Gender relations
• Social policies addressing social inequalities
• Social work addressing precarious life conditions
• Social housing
• Social differences in the mirror of art (literature, music, theater, cinema)

Organizers:
Dr. Amir Sheikhzadegan, University of Fribourg, Fribourg/Switzerland
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ali Zekavati Gharagozlou, University of Kharazmi, Tehran/Iran

The deadline for abstract submissions is January 14, 2018. You will be informed of the result by January 28, 2018.

Contact Information:

Dr. Amir Sheikhzadegan
University of Fribourg, Department of Social Sciences
Section of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work
rte de Bonnesfontaines 11, CH-1700 Fribourg
+41 26 300 77 91 | +41 76 22 22 677 | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


33

Panel Title: Political organization in the era of ideological fatigue: A post-Arab Spring public space

Panel Organizers:

-Dr. Ibrahim ElnurChair
Political Science Department
The American University in Cairo
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

-Dr. Omneya El Naggar
Political Science Department
The American University in Cairo
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This panel seeks to explore the political developments in post-Arab Spring countries, most of which witnessing setbacks in their democratic transition.
In the case of Egypt, for example, there was a shift from a promising pluralism after the 25 January uprising to a marginalization of opposition parties, movements and youth groups starting from 2014.
In addition, The Egyptian Spring caught a lot of the old political parties by surprise and introduced new aspects to the political life in Egypt, including:
-Re-introduction of the idea of overthrowing a ruler that was absent or demonized (as in the case of its adoption by the Muslim Brothers (MB) or jihadists inspired by the thought of Sayid Qutb) since Nasser assumed power
-Incorporation of youth into political life, movements and parties as compared to a previously aging political generation
-Appearance of several movements and coalitions that included both old and new generations
-Exercise of what Asef Bayat calls “street politics” and appearance of several social non-movements, capable of forcing their issues on the public debate agenda
-Increase of the role of social media, not only in providing a platform for the freedom of expression but also for group/movement formation
Despite the radical changes in the political map and the mushrooming of parties after the Egyptian Spring, current political parties have failed to consolidate any concrete form of power due to several reasons, mainly:
1. State clampdown on opposition
2. Internal divisions
3. Ideological fatigue
4. Absence of clear identity / political vision
We invite participants to revisit the political public space both in Egypt and in other Arab Spring countries to assess the current situation. This will include an analysis of the conditions that shapes political mobilization and participation since 2011.
We invite participants to address the following questions:
What forms of political participation developed in the aftermath of the Arab Spring? How effective were they in incurring real change?
What are major setbacks to the democratic transition in the Arab Spring countries?
Whatever happened to the political parties in post-Arab Spring?
Are post Arab Spring parties witnessing an “ideological fatigue”?
What is left of the pre-Arab Spring parties?
What is the current status of the post Arab Spring public space?
Proposal submission and Abstracts:
The deadline for the submission of proposals and abstracts, which should be no more than 150 words, is February 10, 2018.
Abstracts can be submitted by email in Word format. Submissions should be emailed to: Dr. Ibrahim Elnur (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


 32

International Symposium: Teaching Palestine: Pedagogical Praxis and the Indivisibility of Justice

Organized: AMED Studies

Deadline: January 15, 2018

Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.),

Genealogy and Concept:

Initiated by the Arab and Muslim Ethnicities and Diasporas Studies (SFSU) and co-sponsored by several Palestinian and international academic and intellectual institutions (list is in formation; please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), the international symposium on Teaching Palestine: Pedagogical Praxis and the Indivisibility of Justice will be convened during the World Congress of Middle East Studies (WOCMES), in Seville, Spain, July 16-20, 2018.

The symposium is part of AMED Studies’ multi-site and multi-year project on Teaching Palestine: Pedagogical Praxis and the Indivisibility of Justice. It builds on fall 2016-spring 2017 Conversations on Palestine: Colonialism, Racism and Justice, held at and in collaboration with the Center for Place, Culture and Politics at CUNY Graduate Center; spring 2017 Teach-in on Palestine at the Left Forum in New York City on June 3, 2027; the Thematic Conversation at the Middle East Studies Association (MESA) on November 19, 2017; the international conferences at Birzeit, An-Najah National and other Palestinian universities and research centers in Palestine in March 2018 (https://amed.sfsu.edu/content/teaching-palestine-pedagogical-praxis-and-indivisibility-justice); as well as several other symposia, conferences, and seminars at other international locations. For updates, please visit https://amed.sfsu.edu/ or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

More information: here.


31

The United Nations defines transitional justice as “the full range of processes and mechanisms associated with a society’s attempt to come to terms with a legacy of large-scale past abuses, in order to ensure accountability, serve justice and achieve reconciliation.”

The aim of this panel is to examine the progress and challenges in pursuing justice in post-revolutionary Arab states, and the experience of past and ongoing transitional justice processes. We would like to invite researchers in the fields of human rights, transitional justice, history, politics and justice systems of countries such as Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Algeria, Bahrain and Morocco to ponder not only on the role of transitional justice in the region, but also on challenges to its operation more generally.

Contact: María López Belloso This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and Esther Muñoz Nogal: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dedline: February 28th 2018.


30

PANEL "Working class labor and gender in North Africa today"

Organizers :
Emmanuelle Hellio (Mucem, LEST, LabexMed, Aix Marseille Univ.)
Gaëlle Gillot (IEDES, DEVSOC, IRD/Paris 1)
Juana Moreno Nieto (CNE, LEST, LabexMed, Aix Marseille Univ.)

The impact of capitalism on Sexual Division of Labor and women's paid work in North African and Middle East have attracted less attention among social scientists than in other areas of the world (Kandiyoti, 1987. Ramírez, 2010). In the 80's, there was a shift in this tendency due to the interest of International Organizations in women's role in development and the idea that access to school and paid work would enhance women's emancipation. This permitted the publication of articles and reports on the issue[1][1]. However, beyond this literature, gender studies have paid little attention to women's work in the area, and when they have done they have focused mainly in qualified, urban labor. As a result, women working class, rural and domestic labor have remained invisible (Rodary, 2003)

In the economic globalization context, we can observe an increase in studies on feminization of labor in manufactured goods export industries and agrifood sector, especially in countries such as Morocco and Tunisia where the development of this economics sectors has been important (Bourquia, 1998; Labari, 2004; Nair, 2003; Bouasria, 2009; Moreno Nieto, 2012; Khalil 2013, Gillot & Martinez 2014; Barrière, 2015). Women's access to paid work is not a recent phenomenon in North Africa (Noin, 1966; Mernissi, 1982), however research on underlying dynamics of labor markets feminization and its impact on social organization of labor, working experiences or life conditions of working class women in this region is still insufficient.

The main aim of this panel is to go deeper in reflection and encourage a discussion on the following topics related to working class women's labor:

- Gendered dimension of social organization of labor and feminization of labor markets.
- Gender relations in work places.
- Women's labor migrations.
- Working conditions and sexual violence in work places.
- Subjectivities and work experiences.
- Paid and domestic labor articulation.
- Agency and workers strategies to improve their situations
- Non structured and organized forms of resistances in work places.

We encourage papers with a gender approach that take into account the interaction among production, reproduction and the public area (Role of the State, law, sexual ideologies, community relations...)

Deadline for sending proposals: 8th December 2017
Working languages: English or French.
Abstracts up to 350 words.
For further information, please send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ou This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Once your proposal is accepted you will have to register on line before the 9th of December: http://www.wocmes2018seville.org/web/index.php/en/registration


29

La décentralisation et la démocratisation locale de la gouvernance des villes comme perspectives mondiales ? Points de vue depuis l’Afrique et le Moyen-Orient

La généralisation en cours des espaces urbanisés et des métropoles, bien qu’inégalement répandue selon les régions, s’accompagne d’une diffusion planétaire des réformes administratives et institutionnelles en faveur de la décentralisation et de la démocratisation locale de l’action publique (CGLU, 2008 ; Diatta, 2016). Le couple décentralisation et démocratie locale apparaît dans ce contexte comme évident, l’un ne pouvant fonctionner sans l’autre (Paoletti, 2007). Le niveau infranational, avec les collectivités territoriales décentralisées, est considéré désormais comme une échelle pertinente pour répondre aux nouveaux défis des transitions urbaines diverses (environnementales, numériques, économiques, politiques, sociales, religieuses, démographiques…).

A ce titre, de nombreuses associations de collectivités décentralisées se mobilisent et soutiennent le principe d’une reconnaissance accrue à l’échelle internationale, y compris au sein de l’ONU, du rôle et de la responsabilité spécifiques des maires et des gouvernements régionaux dans la résolution des problèmes publics contemporains. L’association mondiale Cités et Gouvernements Locaux Unis (CGLU) créée en 2004 et, avant elle, l’International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI) née en 1990, la Coordinaciòn de las Asociones Mundiales de Ciudades y Autoridades Locales (CAMCAL) lancée en 1996, le Forum panafricain des collectivités et gouvernements locaux d’Afrique, appelé Africités mis en place en 1998, ou encore la Euro-Mediterranean Regional and Local Assembly (ARLEM) depuis 2010, ne sont que quelques exemples illustratifs du mouvement en faveur de la légitimation voire de la sacralisation de la décentralisation et de la démocratie locale comme de nouveaux principes universels de gouvernement.

Dans la littérature scientifique, toute une série de travaux ont étudié les (re)configurations des pouvoirs politiques locaux et les mutations de l’action publique dans ce contexte. Certains analysent l’impact de la crise financière de 2008 sur les compétences et les capacités des collectivités locales (Kuhlmann et Bouckaert, 2016, Pasquier 2016). D’autres interrogent les changements dans les modalités de gouvernance des territoires (Brenner, 1999 ; Kübler et Schwab 2007, Giersig 2008). D’autres auteurs encore s’intéressent aux potentiels et aux stratégies des villes face, entre autres, au changement climatique, au terrorisme, aux inégalités (Serre 2014, Barber 2015).

Néanmoins, si les secteurs et les contextes étudiés varient selon les auteurs, les travaux ont en commun de s’être appuyés, pour l’essentiel, sur des terrains américains et européens. C’est donc en Occident que les études sur la décentralisation et la démocratie locale sont nées et se sont le plus développées. Les contextes dans les pays l’Afrique et du Moyen-Orient ont été relativement peu étudiées (Balanche 2008, Ibrahim et Singerman 2014, Beckouche 2011).

Ainsi, l’objectif du panel est de voir examinées les spécificités et les convergences que pourraient présenter les expériences de la décentralisation et de la gouvernance urbaine dans ces pays par rapport aux nombreux cas étudiés ailleurs. Par exemple, que nous apprend le terrain des collectivités territoriales en Afrique et au Moyen-Orient sur : la décentralisation ?, l’aménagement du territoire ?, le pouvoir politique des élus locaux ?, le développement local ?, la place des habitants et de la société civile organisée ?, le rôle de l’Etat central ?, la circulation internationale de modèles de politiques publiques ?, etc. C’est à l’analyse des enjeux, des dynamiques et des défis de la décentralisation et de la gouvernance urbaine locale, depuis l’Afrique et le Moyen-Orient, que ce panel propose de réfléchir.

Organisateurs du panel:

Patrice DIATTA (Docteur en science politique, chargé de recherche et de développement, Chaire TMAP/ Sciences Po Rennes, UMR 6051_ARENES-Crape). Contact : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. 


28

"The effect of external actors in the internal political processes in the MENA region"

Keywords: democracy, Arab Spring, authorirarian resilience, European Union, international relations, political science

The aim of this panel it is to approach the political changing or resistance processes in the MENA area through the study of the external interference in the internal processes.

It is particularly interesting for us to approach the processes framed within the Arab Spring, which has been actively affected by external actors such the EU or the United States or by other regional actors and the effects of this pressure in order to consolidate changing or continuation of the former regimes.

Therefore, authors are invited to submit a title, a short abstract (150 words maximum) and information about their institutional affiliation and contact to
Prof. Dr. Bosco Govantes, Universidad Pablo de Olavide (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).


27

The Arabic Press in the 19th C: History, Development, and Impact

Although the significance of the Arabic press as a primary vehicle of the revival of Arabic culture in the second half of the 19th C has long been recognized, its systematic study is still in its early stages and there remain many unexplored topics and themes. Some historical and literary studies of 19th C Syria and Egypt have utilized the press as a source of data, but very few have studied it as a sociocultural phenomenon and examined its role in the formation of modern identities, discourses, and literary forms in the Arab East. Of particular interest to this panel are the early years of the press in Beirut, when periodicals such as Ḥadīqat al-Akhbār (1858-1911), al-Jinān (1870-1886), al-Bashīr (1870-1947), and Thamarāt al-Funūn (1875-1908) pioneered journalism in the region and provided a forum for the circulation of new ideas, vocabulary, and subjectivities. However, contributions that cover periodicals that appeared in other parts of the Middle East in the late 19th and early 20th century are also welcome. Even periodicals in other languages, such as Ottoman Turkish, could be included in this panel.

This proposed panel invites papers that deal with various aspects of the early Arabic press, including (but not limited to) its role in the evolution of modern Arabic sociological and political vocabulary; discourses and debates in Arabic periodicals about society, religion, science, and politics; censorship and relationship with authorities; reception among different social groups; production and networks of distribution; and finally theoretical, methodological, and comparative approaches to the study of the Arabic press.

The panel aims at creating an opportunity for scholars working on different periodicals or different aspects of the Arabic press to bring their insights together and stimulate a discussion about its early history and its social and cultural significance.

Deadline to submit abstracts: 08 January 2018.
Notification of results: 15 January 2018.
Deadline to submit the full text of accepted papers: 01 May 2018.

Organizer:
Mohammad Magout, PhD
Senior Researcher
The Humanities Centre for Advanced Studies “Multiple Secularities - Beyond the West, Beyond Modernities”, University of Leipzig
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


26

Tourism to and from the Arab World: Challenges, Potentials, Risks

Panel at the Fifth World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES )
16-22 July 2018, Seville (Spain)
Organised by the German Tourism Research Group (Arbeitskreis Tourismusforschung in der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Geographie e.V., AKTF)
Chaired by Nadine Scharfenort (Passau University/Germany) and Hans Hopfinger (Catholic University Eichstaett-Ingolstadt/Germany)
The Arab World from Morocco to Bahrain finds itself in a period of change and crisis with fundamental consequences for the destinations in the Arab world, especially as outgoing destinations from the so-called Western countries. At the same time the perception of Islam in Western countries is changing due to the afflux of refugees as well as terrorist attacks, thus influencing the incoming tourism from the Arab countries to Europe and America.
The destinations in the Arab World are trying to face the challenges in quite different ways, including different product and branding strategies or the role of specific target groups, including inner-Arab tourism. Destinations outside the Arab World are challenged, too, to position themselves in addressing tourists from Arab source markets and preserving/improving an attracting and hospitable welcoming environment.
The panel intends to investigate the challenges the destinations in the Arab World are facing, but also invites studies focusing on the role of Arab tourists in destinations outside Arab countries. Colleagues interested in presenting their research results or works in progress are welcome to contact the organisers of the session. Contributors are asked to submit a title, a short abstract (150 words maximum) and information about their institutional affiliation and contact. Please clearly indicate the research question, concepts and empirical material your research is or will be based on. Please note that papers will be accepted in English only.

Prof. Dr. Nadine Scharfenort, Department of Geography, Passau University
Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Prof. Dr. Hans Hopfinger, Leisure and Tourism Geography, Catholic University of Eichstaett-Ingolstadt
Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


25

Youth from the ‘Margins’: De-marginalisation Strategies in South and East Mediterranean Countries.

Convenors:
Elena Sánchez-Montijano, Senior Research Fellow at CIDOB
José Sánchez, Senior Research at UPF

The upraising of 2011 has challenged the patterns of youth subjectivities, exclusion and ways to escape from the marginalization. Marginalization could be seen as a process in which some deviant attitudes, ideologies, values, practices and beliefs are ‘excluded’ in the society in contrast with the hegemonic procedures (Bayat, 2012). Nevertheless, at the same time, this marginalization allows to create social spaces and opportunities to establish and manage organized, territorially based movements aiming at achieving social transformation, emancipation or an alternative modernity. In consequence, their marginalized position in social structures permits, at same time, innovative and creative manners to manage their situation to change the society as a whole. These marginalized social groups, in their immediate day-to-day activities, struggle for a share of urban services, alternative economic strategies, alternative means of production and for ‘the right to the city’.

We invite authors to send their proposals of papers, ideally dealing with one of these questions from a theoretical or empirical approach: 1) Is there a specific repertoire of the marginalisation?; 2) What are the impacts of "marginalised" collective action or agency for social change?; 3) Which are the main youth strategies to scape of this marginalisation (de-marginalisation strategies); 4) How the governments (different levels) and their public policies do react to these strategies?

If you would like to participate in the panel, please send us a title, a short abstract (250 words maximum) and information about your institutional affiliation and contact. Time schedule for submission:

Deadline for abstract submission to convenors: 04th December 2017
Acceptance / refusal notice: 07th December 2017
WOCMES conference authors’ registration*: 08-09th November 2017
Official submission of proposed panel: 09th December 2017

*In case of acceptance of a paper to the panel proposal, the author(s) of the accepted papers must register with the conference organizers at http://wocmes2018seville.org/web/index.php/en/registration (and reconfirm this to the panel organizers). The panel proposal with all individual abstracts can only be officially submitted if all panel participants are registered.

To send your proposal or questions: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


24

Wars on the Middle East and Their Effects on the Warring Countries: A Historical Re-examination

In an attempt to locate the Middle East in the context of world history, this panel is going to examine the series of wars waged on the Middle East (such as the colonial encroachment by the Western powers of the territories of the Ottoman Empire and North Africa in the latter half of the 19th century, the Suez War in the 1956, and the War on Iraq in our own time) and their effects on the politics and society of the Western countries which waged these wars.

While a paper presented by the organizer of this panel will focus on the case of British wars against Egypt and Sudan in the 1880s and their effects on the development of anti-war movement in Western countries, papers dealing with other wars from different perspectives will be most welcome. These might include topics such as: the effects of the Crimean War on Western countries, the significance of “Middle Eastern experiences” ( such as wars against Ottoman Empire and colonial expansion towards Iran) as a background of the Russian Revolution, the effects of the Iraqi War on the present US politics, etc.

Papers investigating the effects of colonial wars on the cultures and ideologies of the warring countries (such as the growth of racism, fascism, “Islamophobia”, and the other undemocratic tendencies) will be welcome as well.

Organizer: Yoshiko Kurita
Professor of Middle Eastern History, Department of History, Chiba University, Japan (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

If you are interested in participating, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and send your paper proposal (including a title and a 400-500 word abstract) by 3 December.


23

CFP for panel on the Gülen Movement in light of the July 15, 2016, coup attempt in Turkey

For the 2018 WOCMES meetings, 16-22 July in Seville, Spain

We are seeking paper abstracts for a WOCMES 2018 proposed panel on developments in the Gülen Movement in light of the July 15, 2016, attempted coup d’etat in Turkey. There has been much academic discussion and debate about the movement’s structure, projects, and religious, economic, and political motivations. Movement members themselves have also promoted a particular image of Gülen and his community through many co-sponsored events over the years. This panel seeks to bring together interested academics and others to discuss the state of the movement in the context of the rapidly changing political situation in Turkey and within the international context, especially after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan accused the movement of spearheading the July 15, 2016, coup. Possible topics include:

• Discursive framing of the coup attempt and its aftermath by Erdoğan, Gülen, and other stakeholders in the conflict in Turkey
• The movement’s differing representations of itself in Turkey and in the West, and how these differences contribute to the production of contrasting scholarly narratives among Western and Turkish academics
• The effects of shuttering of many institutions (schools, hospitals, media organizations, international aid organizations, etc.) associated with the movement in Turkey
• What has happened to the movement within Turkey since the coup attempt
• What is happening with the movement in various international contexts
• How the government’s attempt to clamp down on the movement has had wide-ranging political and human rights effects
• Speculations about what the future may hold for the movement and for Turkey itself.

This event isn't meant to be a platform to disparage or praise the movement, but to produce an interdisciplinary discussion about an influential international organization deeply implicated in the political evolution of Turkey.

Please send panel abstracts (250-300 words) to: Dr. Kim Shively, Professor of Anthropology, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, USA, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by Dec. 1, 2017.


22

PARLIAMENTARY ACTORS IN/AND THE MEDITERRANEAN
Symposium Organizer: Dr. Stelios Stavridis (ARAID/University of Zaragoza)

In the past years, the international role of national and transnational parliamentary bodies has increased significantly. It is possible to speak now of a multi-layered parliamentary field in world affairs (Crum and Fossum 2009; Jancic 2015). International Parliamentary Institutions (IPIs) have equally proliferated (Cofelice 2012; 2015; Costa, Dri and Stavridis 2013; Crum and Fossum 2013). The MENA region is no exception: there are in fact a large number of such actors (see Cofelice and Stavridis 2017). In addition, several parliamentary actors in the Mare Nostrum have developed their own diplomacy (Stavridis and Gianniou 2016).
This new phenomenon - which remains rather understudied academically - consists actually several interrelated developments (Stavridis 2002):
(1) the first covers “internally” the questions of democratic accountability and legitimacy of public policies, and, “externally” the promotion of democratic norms, rules and practices abroad (both could be grouped under the generic term of “democratization”). Moreover, there is now renewed interest in the role of parliaments at the national level following the so-called “Arab Spring” has added real or potential relevance for a democratic perspective for several of these countries in the Southern Mediterranean (Burke 2012; Shalaby 2016; see also Cofelice 2016; Reinprecht and Levin 2015).
(2) Within a globalizing world, there exist new forms of regionalism (Söderbaum and Shaw 2003; Hettne 2007) that have led to urgency about how to render all those processes more legitimate and representative (Sabic 2008; Kraft-Kasack 2008; Cutler 2011; Peters 2013; Wagner 2013; Cabrera 2015).
(3) As already noted, parliamentary bodies have more and more developed their own diplomatic stances over several issues, leading to what has been labelled “parliamentary diplomacy” (Stavridis 2002; Eloriagga 2004; Weisglas and de Boer 2007; Fiott 2011; Stavridis and Jancic 2017).
The objective of this symposium is to group these three dimensions so that scholars can carry out further analysis on those subjects. There are for the time being three pre-organized panels. For each of them up to two places can still be added to complete the maximum allowed under WOCMES rules. Of course, more panels could be organized if necessary. Panel 1 will consider IPIs in the Mediterranean; Panel 2 will look at the parliaments in the Southern Mediterranean after the “Arab Spring”; Panel 3 will study the role of parliaments in the diplomacy of small states in the Mediterranean. The first two themes have been addressed by the literature in the

past although there remains plenty of room for further study, hence the utility and purpose of those two panels. The third panel will add a new field of research as there is to date almost no analysis on this particular issue.
PANELS
PANEL 1: “International Parliamentary Institutions/IPIs in the Mediterranean” Panel organizer: Dr. Andrea Cofelice TBC
Chair: Prof. Daniela Irrera (University of Catania)
Discussant: TBA
Panelists:
- Mapping IPIs in the Mediterranean: what next?, Dr. Andrea Cofelice TBC
- Comparing the two ENP inter-parliamentary dimensions: UfM PA and Euronest, Cosima
Glahn (Freie Universität Berlin)
- The European Parliament and the conflict in the Western Sahara, Raquel Alemañ Navalón
(“EuropaNova”, Paris)
- The European Parliament and Syria, Dr. Stelios Stavridis (ARAID/University of
Zaragoza)
PANEL 2: “Parliaments in the Middle East and North Africa: A Struggle for Relevance” PANEL organizers: Paul M. Esber (University of Sydney) & Dr. Jan Claudius Völkel (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
Chair: Dr. Jan Claudius Völkel (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
Discussant: Dr. Florian Kohstall (Freie Universität Berlin) Panelists:
- Parliament and Transformation in Egypt: From Clientelism to Representation and the Way Back, Prof. Mazen Hassan (Cairo University) & Dr. Ahmed Abd Rabou (University of Denver)
- The Hashemite Theatre? Parliament and Reform Dancing on the post-2011 Stage in Jordan, Paul M. Esber (University of Sydney)
- The Constraints on Parliament in a Sectarian Power Sharing System: The Lebanese Case, Prof. Tamirace Fakhoury (Lebanese American University) & Dr. Carmen Geha (American University in Beirut)
- Making Legislation in a Failed State: The Case of Libya, Prof. Amal Obeidi (University of Benghazi/Universität Bayreuth)
PANEL 3: “Small states and parliamentary diplomacy”
Panel organizer: Dr. Victor Valentini (Université Clermont Auvergne)
Chair: Prof. Charalambos Tsardanidis (University of the Aegean & KMEA/Centre for Security Studies, Athens)
Discussant: Dr. Stelios Stavridis
Panelists:
- The foreign policy of Middle Eastern micro-states, Dr. Victor Valentini (Université Clermont Auvergne)
- International su.pport for a parliament in the making: The case of Tunisia, Dr. Jan Claudius Völkel (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
- Israel ́s parliamentary diplomacy, Dr. Yoav Shemer (Université de Strasbourg)
- Parliamentary Diplomatic efforts of Croatia as a small state on Mediterranean, Prof. Lidija Kos- Stanišić (University of Zagreb) & Prof. Dana Luša (University of Zagreb).

As the WOCMES deadline has been extended to late February, if you are interested in submitting a paper for this Symposium, please send an email marked “WOCMES 2018 Symposium Proposal” with your paper title and abstract (up to 200 words) plus your name, affiliation etc., to Dr. Stelios Stavridis: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. – as soon as possible, but not later than 16 February 2018


21

International Relations and Islamic Studies Research Cohort (Co-IRIS) http://www.coiris.org/newsletters/call-for-papers-co-iris-panels-at-wocmes-2018/

1st Panel: “Islam and Democracy”
The two terms in the title of this section are contentious and therefore the first thing the abstracts and papers have to do is define what they mean. The papers could address: Democratic practice in any historical context, comparative Nation-state practices, or theoretical arguments. The call for papers will focus on new and innovative presentations of Islam and democracy, since the topic has a legacy of numerous contributions.

2nd Panel: “Diplomacy in Islam: Past and Present”
The intellectual history and practice of international relations in Islam has long been understudied within both the field of International Relations and of Middle Eastern Studies. In this framework, the issue of diplomacy in Islam has almost gone unnoticed and unaddressed in mainstream academia. However, on the one hand the evolving interaction between Islam and politics in recent years has brought to fore the necessity of rethinking the nature and goals of diplomacy and international relations in Islam and how they contribute or challenge mainstream paradigms and practices of world affairs and, on the other hand, Muslim religious scholars have long argued that the diplomatic and international realms are incorporated in the overall worldview of Islam and, therefore, there exist analogues to the concepts of diplomacy (what we can call “Islamic diplomacy”) and international relations in Islamic sources and intellectual history which deserve serious attention by both academicians and political practitioners. This panel focuses on diplomacy, addressing both how Muslim scholars have conceptualized diplomacy and Muslim countries practiced it throughout history, from the time of the Prophet Muhammad up until current days, both in terms of intra-community diplomatic relations, i.e. relations of Muslim countries within the community of Islam, and trans-community, i.e. relations of Muslim countries with non-Muslim countries. The overall aim of the panel is to draw a first overall picture of diplomacy in Islam as a basis for future research.

3rd Panel: “Islamic Law and International Law”
Explores interdisciplinary approaches of Islamic Studies to law especially how Islamic law (loosely understood as shari’ah) engages with the internationality aspect of human laws including public and private international laws. It seeks to uncover the global and ethical dimensions of Islamic law and how it responds to international conventions, regional institutions, and transnational norms, in particular, the flexibility of shari’ah as it evolves over time and space so as to achieve its higher moral objectives.

- Paper proposals must include a title, a 300-400 word abstract, and 100-word bio note.
- Proposals must be in English.
- Deadline for submission: 30 November 2017
- Submit your proposals to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and include carbon copies to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


20

Revisiting Colonial Morocco: French and Spanish Policies, Moroccan Nationalism and National Identity

The main goal of this panel is to review some of the issues surrounding colonial intervention in Morocco, the role of Moroccan nationalism in the nation’s struggle for independence, and the impact of both in shaping Moroccan national identity, focusing on the differences between French and Spanish colonial policies and practices. The panel emphasizes the significance of the period of the protectorate as a fundamental historical rupture that cannot be parenthesized but rather must be integrally woven into our understanding of contemporary Morocco, and attempts to promote a revised version of Spanish and French colonial history from a multidisciplinary perspective that conveys the complexities, nuances, and contradictions of this critical transition in the country’s history.
Starting from this approach, the panel will promote the analysis focuses on the following topics:
- Colonial intervention in ethnic and religious identity in colonial and post-colonial Morocco: Imazighen, Arabs, Jews and Muslims.
- Nationalist ideology: political, social and religious bases and its legacy in independent Morocco.
- French and Spanish colonial practices and policies towards rural and local actors during the protectorate period.
- International dimension of Moroccan nationalism movement: cultural articulation, political objectives, and economic and diplomatic support.
- Symbolic strategies used by Moroccans nationalists to reinforce their specificities in front European colonization.
- Inheritances and footprints of Colonial culture and traditions in the current Morocco.

Paper proposals must include a title and a 300-400 word abstract
Deadline for submission: 6 December 2017
Acceptance / refusal notice: 7 December 2017
WOCMES conference registration: By 9 December 2017
Deadline to submit the full text of accepted papers: 10 March 2018
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


19

Teaching and learning Middle East and North Africa through domestic and international fiction and non-fiction

Learning depends upon freeing the message from the constraints of the situation at hand

Teaching International Relations and Political Science using films is increasingly popular. The use of this pedagogical tool has some clear advantages we want to point out. Films and other visual materials can help students move from a theoretical and narrative discussion to a more concrete empirical arena. As pointed out by Gregg (1999:129), films constitute a “window on the world” that “engage our attention by dramatizing and personalizing ideas and events, build bridges to increasingly remote but still important times, and serve as catalysts for debate and further inquiry on the world that should not be dismissed lightly”. Students become familiar with different topics not only by class discussions and presentations but also by a close-to-empirical experience. In this way, as watching a film “involves the use of both halves of the brain” (Engert and Spencer, 2009:99) making learning easier. Moreover, films tend to engage spectators’ emotions. This enables students to identify with different characters and better understand their emotions and motivations. In addition, it enhances their understanding of the depicted experiences through the character’s eyes helping them in taking their approach to reality.

This approach assumes films (and other visual materials) as representations of reality. Their proponents maintain “that a real world exists” and that it “can be investigated from the outside with ‘scientific’ means in order to establish an unbiased and real truth” (Engert and Spencer, 2009:84).

While positivists understand films, especially documentaries) as useful tools to observe, describe and analyze the ‘world-out-there’, post-positivists see them as cultural productions to be analyzed. As cultural artifacts themselves (Algeo, 2007: 133), these representations of far-away-worlds “establish a discourse of identity politics as the frame of reference for world politics” and “highlight the relationship between knowledge and power” (Campbell, 2013: 224). From this perspective, films are used to encourage students to de-construct the audiovisual/narrative discourse -which is understood as “a specific series of representations and practices through which meanings are produced, identities constituted, social relations established, and political and ethical outcomes made more or less possible” (Campbell, 2013: 234)-. In this vein, students are encouraged to unveil power relations. To achieve this goal, they are asked to reflect about how the story is constructed (more than about the story itself). Later, they have to think about the consequences of the unveiled discourse on world politics. As pointed out by Weber, “[u]sing popular films in this way helps us to get a sense of the everyday connections between ‘the popular’ and ‘the political” and allows us to see “how IR myths become everyday myths -because they are circulated, received, and criticized in and through everyday, popular forms like films” (Weber, 2010: 9).
This panel welcomes submissions reporting research on the use of audiovisual content in the classroom conceived in very broad terms. The panel scope includes the following topics:

• Use of films/documentaries/Tv shows in the classroom: advantages, disadvantages, and limits;
• Effects of audiovisual material on students’ learning process, perceptions and classroom discussion;
• Empirical case studies
• Comparison between domestic and international audiovisual material on one topic.
• De-construction of the cultural products (movies/documentaries/Tv shows).

In addition to the topics listed above, any other proposal related to this panel would be considered.
The final deadline for us to submit our panel proposal to WOCMES is December 9th. Therefore, abstracts (of no more than 300 words) can be send to Beatriz Tomé (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) or Lucía Ferreiro (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) until November 30th.

References

  • Algeo, Katie (2007): “Teaching Cultural Geography with Bend It Like Beckham”, Journal of Geography, 106:3, p.133-143.
  • Campbell, David (2013): “Poststructuralism”, in Tim Dunne, Milja Kurki , and Steve Smith (eds.): International Relations Theories. Discipline and Diversity, (Third Edition), Oxford: Oxford University Press, p. 223-246.
  • Engert, Stefan and Alexander Spencer (2009): “International Relations at the Movies: Teaching and Learning about International Politics through Film”, Perspectives, vol.17, n.1, p. 83-104.
  • Gregg, Robert W. (1999): “The Ten Best Films about International Relations”, World Policy Journal, vol.16, nº2, p. 129-134.
  • Kuzma, Lynn M. and Patrick J. Haney (2001): “And . . . Action! Using Film to Learn about Foreign Policy”, International Studies Perspectives, nº2, p.33-50.
  • Shapiro, Michael J. (2009): Cinematic Geopolitics, London: Routledge.
  • Weber, Cynthia (2009): International Relations Theory A critical introduction (third edition), London: Routledge.

18

Religion and civil society organizations in the Mediterranean: strengthening interreligious dialogue and tackling radicalisation

Organizer: Daniela Irrera, University of Catania

Chair: Inmaculada Marrero Rocha, University of Granada
Discussant: Fulvio Attinà, University of Catania

PANEL RATIONALE:

The scholarship on the influence of religion in politics has consistently grown in the last years. Students of International Relations, European studies and Sociology have analyzed and described such impact, particularly on foreign policy and other related issues, such as development and aid policies or security and defence cooperation.

Such analyses have particularly focused, on the one hand, on the actors, both positive (NGOs, civil society organisations; local communities) and negative (radical groups and movements); and, on the other, on the mechanisms and practices through which religion exerts an influence and/or is utilised to achieve broader results.

The panel will aim at enlarging the existing knowledge on these two specific aspects. While some interesting contributions on the role of CSOs already exist (Cutler, 2001; Velasco Pufleau, 2017), particularly on their ability to strengthen the transparency of the decision-making procedures and to expand the representativeness, further research is needed: in particular over how this happens in non-democratic contexts and towards non-democratic partners, with an empirical emphasis to fit the WOCMES theme, namely the EU dialogue with MENA countries.

Security issues show strong divergences among states’ preferences (Reinalda, 2011; Nitoiu and Sus, 2015). Among them, the role/importance of religion is undervalued and requires deeper investigation (Funk and Woolner, 2011; Seiple et al., 2013). Any security policy, particularly concerning the Mediterranean, implies the need to consider the relevance of religion as an essential dimension for fostering dialogue among different cultures and for tackling radicalisation and the root causes of political violence and terrorism.

The panel aims at assessing the state of the art, present empirical case studies, and, as importantly, to launch innovative research lines on the topic. Papers that cover both theoretical reflections and empirical investigations (case studies) are welcome.

As this is a pre-call, academics (seniors and juniors, including PhD candidates) are invited to send a draft title and abstract to Daniela Irrera This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 30th November 2017.


 16

Title: new trends in models of development in MENA countries: any prospects for success?

organiser and chair of panel: Mounia Seffar
researcher in center of doctoral studies in law economic and management, 3rd year Phd department of public law, university of Abdelmalek Essaadi in Morocco, Under the supervision of Prof. Dr, Ali El hanaoudi (university of Abdelmalek Essaadi)

The question of development was and still the most important on the agenda especially of the states and international organisations and a big indicator to classify the countries.

increasingly becoming important with facts that question the effectiveness of policies, to a greater extent in countries such MENA region, which mainly classified as Under-developed countries and it is a paradox when we talk about new trends of development question the current trends in terms of diagnosis and evaluation.

some countries like kingdom of Morocco has announced recently oficilay the need to a new model of development, could achieve a balance between economic and social requirements, in parallel with society requirements.

the purpose of this panel is to contribute to transfer this debate to the international scientific and academic arena, and openness to various expériences through papers on some proposed points:

- critical review of development concepts, development schools, reads in development reports,
- experiences of countries, case studies...
- Special problematics about to which extent the current trends of development could achieve people’s aspiration? To which degree the references of international model of development respond to the context and references of such MENA countries? Does anything changed in international level could really led to apply a new model of development in underdeveloped countries .

Notes:

any other points in same trend are accepted
on level of experiences we accept also papers about non- MENA countries.
A big interest will be given to the methodological side in papers especially those worked by interdesciplinary approach, multidesciplinary approach, or judicial reading (laws, conventions, reports...) , socio-political reading, a model of sector , case study, impact study...

About submission:

Deadline to submit your 500 words of abstract is: 5 December 2017

Acceptance/refusal notice deadline: 28 december 2017

deadline to submit the full text of accepted papers is: 15 March 2018

pay attention to the conference registration

abstracts and papers should be only in english, and please note:

full papers should be between 10 and 15 pages including cover, figures, annexes, refrences…

the cover should include obligatory: author name, co-author in case, his positions, title, e-mail, mention to the conference and panel details submitted for.

The core of article should respect the criteria for writing scientific papers according to the party which the author belongs, but without omission a clear problematic.

The abstract should mention inside obligatory to the problematic and methodology, key ideas or axises.

please send your proposals to this e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , include wocmes on the email title letter.


15

Oil, Institutions and economic development: Policy challenges for the oil MENA region in a post Arab spring era

This proposed panel has already two paper proposals and is seeking two more. The panel covers the role of oil, institutions and economic development in the oil economies of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and the oil MENA region in general. The panel will explore the “myth” of the resource curse as it relates to the oil MENA region by looking at countries endowed with oil riches but which defied the so-called oil curse such as Norway and countries with zero resource wealth such as Singapore that did well. The goal is to show that oil plays no role in the lackluster economic performance of oil MENA compared to Norway and Singapore. The literature on the link between oil and democracy in MENA is another area that the panel wishes to explore as well as an oil privatization model as a way to explore a transitional path to a more open political space.

1.   First paper:

Title:  Institutional Obstructions to Dealing Effectively with the Population Problem in MENA

Abstract:

The lack of effective and inclusive economic and political institutions impedes MENA countries from effectively dealing with an increasingly serious population problem. This paper explores these impediments and their likely consequences.  It also envisions a chain of consequences from adopting better institutions that would mitigate the population problem.

Presenter: Dennis D. Miller
Professor of Economics
Department of Economics
Baldwin Wallace University
Berea, Ohio, USA

Co-author: Mohammed Akacem
Professor of Economics
Department of Economics
Metropolitan State University of Denver
Denver, CO, USA

2.    Second paper:

Title: Oil privatization as transition to a more stable oil MENA: Why institutions matter.

Abstract:

This paper will explore the institutional deficit in MENA with an emphasis on the oil economies of the region. It will reject the resource curse in the case of the oil MENA region and instead presents an alternative explanation as to why the region lags behind other oil economies such as Norway or even a non-oil economy such as Singapore. An oil privatization model will be presented as a way to transition to more accountable and stable governments.

Presenter: Mohammed Akacem

Professor of Economics
Department of Economics
Metropolitan State University of Denver
Denver, CO, USA

Co-author: Dennis D. Miller
Professor of Economics
Department of Economics
Baldwin Wallace University
Berea, Ohio, USA


Contact: Professor Mohammed Akacem
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., please write “Oil MENA panel WOCMES 2008” in the subject line of the email for authors wishing to send abstracts for this panel.


14

The German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn and the Economic Research Forum (ERF), Cairo, Egypt announce a joint call for papers for a panel at the 5th World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES), Seville/ Spain, 16-20 July 2018.

Panel:

Title: "New social contracts for MENA countries: political settlement and societal reconstruction"

Discipline: political science & philosophy, sociology, contemporary area & development studies, international relations

Panel Organiser Institutions:

  • German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn
  • Economic Research Forum (ERF), Cairo Egypt

The Arab spring has demonstrated that the “old social contracts” have defaulted in MENA countries: These old contracts worked on the basis of governments (‘the state’) providing basic services to many, economic privileges and political access to some (‘regime cronies’) while in exchange, citizens could not claim much of real representation (or ‘voice’) in government - let alone accountability. Six years into the revolutionary process that started in 2011, the region suffers from the deterioration of means for generating political legitimacy, with few exceptions.

Defining (or redefining) the social contracts is perhaps the most important task for a country emerging from revolutionary upheaval and violent conflict. At its most fundamental level, ‘social contract’ refers to the basic – if only implicit – agreement among the groups that make up a society about how political decisions are taken and economic resources distributed. Eventually, state or proto-state institutions are needed for the provision of individual security, collective stability and guidance for social and economic development. But before governments can legitimately offer these things, a new social contract defining terms for state-society and intra-societal relations needs to be settled - formally or at least implicitly.

This is primarily a domestic process, in that the social contract needs to emerge from the societies themselves, through the development of norms of peaceful cooperation rather than violence in managing conflicts over decision-making powers and the distribution of resources. There is a role for international norms (as the Sustainable Development Goals, in particular SDG16 ‘building inclusive societies’) and for international actors as well (regional and global ones). For external actors there is a role in providing material and moral support, guidance, technical capacity and incentives to national settlement and peacebuilding processes. As can be observed in the MENA region, the role of external actors can be either positive or destructive to the emergence of a social contract. 

Papers in this panel address three fundamental questions. First, what is required of a social contract in order that it provide for peaceful transformation of state-society and intra-societal relations? Second, with reference to fragile and conflict-affected countries in the MENA region, how can a social contract emerge when key social actors do not recognize the government as legitimate? Third, what changes are likely to be required for different social groups to engage in peaceful relations with each other and/or the state, and what changes can different MENA states realistically offer? In addition, by inviting panelists from the region in particular, the discussions shall be used to explore a) the compatibility of the emerging concept of the ‘social contract’ with local contexts (both normative and empirical) and b) its usefulness - either as an analytical tool or as a normative reference (e.g. in Rojava/Syria).

Organisers:

  • Bernhard Trautner, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Ramage Nada, logistics officer, Economic Research Forum, Cairo, Egypt This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Please send your 500 word abstracts by November 25th to the organiser and your full papers by December 30th for a final decision. ERF will cover the cost of ERF Research Associates and Affiliates.


13

The German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn, Germany, The Institute for Policy Research (IPR), University of Bath, UK, and the Economic Research Forum (ERF), Cairo, Egypt announce a joint call for papers for two Panels at the 5th World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES), Seville/ Spain, 16-20 July 2018.

Panel 1:

Title: Building prosperity through sound economic policies in MENA: Industrial Policy, Growth, Investment, Informality, and International Trade

Discipline: Economic policies

Panel Organiser Institutions:

  • German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn, Germany,
  • Economic Research Forum (ERF), Cairo, Egypt.

The Arab Spring left behind severe frustrations for the masses in the MENA region. Civil wars have since sparked in Libya, Syria, Yemen and Iraq. Egypt is moving away from the goal of a market economy. The fall in oil prices has caused a sharp drop in the Gulf countries’ current and future wealth. Economic reforms in Jordan, Algeria, and Morocco are stalling creating challenges for both sets of countries. Iran and Turkey face economic challenges of their own. Even Tunisia struggles in its transition to democracy and its transformation into a dynamic economy.

What reforms can and should these countries adopt given the mounting pressure of a bulge of unemployed and frustrated youth. What are the features of an inclusive Industrial Policy that promotes growth in the region? How can the framework conditions be improved to ensure growth and productivity enhancing structural transformation that balances between jobless versus penniless growth? How is trade policy involved and how can the trend of labour transition into low-productivity informal sectors be curbed? What role can multilateral and bilateral donors play in the regions’ efforts to achieve for sound economic policies. What role can they play to boost investment and trade in the region?

Organisers:

  • Markus Loewe, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Amirah El-Haddad German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn, Germany; FEPS, Cairo University; and ERF, Cairo, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Please send your 500 word abstracts by November 25th to both organisers and your full papers by December 30th for a final decision. ERF will cover the cost of ERF Research Associates and Affiliates.

Panel 2:

Title: Social policies in MENA countries: Do they pursue social, economic or political goals?

Discipline: Economic and social development
Panel Organiser Institutions:

  • German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn
  • Institute for Policy Research (IPR), University of Bath, UK
  • Economic Research Forum (ERF), Cairo Egypt
  • The Middle East and North Africa Social Policy (MENA-SP) research network

The current interest in social protection in the MENA region sparks a wider debate about the nature of social contracts and social policies there. The aim of this panel is to interrogate the nature of these conceptual and policy linkages further because social policies play a key role in the development of every country by virtue of them having not only social but also economic and political functions. Their social function is to guarantee a minimum standard of living for everybody and thereby reduce multidimensional poverty and inequality. Their economic function is to prevent people from falling into poverty because of risks such as old age, illness or unemployment. As such, social protection systems also encourage people, even those with limited income, to invest their savings in better means of production or human capital instead of hording them in case a risk occurs. In this way, they promote pro-poor growth. And the political function of social protection is to alleviate peoples' concerns about the future, contributing to their general satisfaction and stabilising the political system.

Papers presented in the panel “Social policies in MENA countries: Do they pursue social, economic or political goals?” discuss to what degree the social policies of MENA countries fulfil their three functions: How effective are they in fighting multidimensional poverty and inequality? How well do they protect vulnerable people and help them to engage more in economic activities? How do they do in strengthening social inclusion and social cohesion? Are they well-tailored to the needs of people? Or do they mainly serve the political interests of those who have set them up: authoritarian governments, religious NGOs, international donors? Papers exploring contemporary or past policies are welcome as well as both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. We also encourage think pieces, which can offer new ideas about the potential way forward for research in this field.

Organisers:

  • Rana Jawad, Institute for Policy Research (IPR), University of Bath, UK, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Markus Loewe, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn, Germany, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Please send your 500 word abstracts by November 25th to both organisers and your full papers by December 30th for a final decision. ERF will cover the cost of ERF Research Associates and Affiliates.


12

Open Panel for the Fifth World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES-5)

Seville, Spain, 16-17 July 2018

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Panel Title:

Amazigh Cinema at Large: Challenges and Hopes

Panel Organizer:

Habiba Boumlik, Associate Professor, City University of New York, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Panel Members:

Habiba Boumlik, Associate Professor, City University of New York, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Lucy McNair, Associate Professor, City University of New York, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Yahya Laayouni, Associate Professor, Bloomsburg University, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Soubeika Bahri, Ph.D Candidate, CUNY Graduate Center, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Proposal

Amazigh/Berber identity is made of a diverse cultural and linguistic heritage covering area from the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean to Siwa Oasis in Egypt, and encompassing sub-Saharan Africa and the vast European and American diasporas. Transnational in nature, yet profoundly marked by local and national boundaries, languages, and histories, Amazigh narratives in film present a compelling, contemporary approach to the human condition that the poet Nabil Fares deftly describes as “the universal –or the local without the walls.”

This panel seeks to engage a discussion of cultural production across the Amazigh space and encourage a diversity of perspectives and theoretical lenses. The aim of the panel is also to analyze Amazigh transnational identities as they are reflected in film, and to develop an overview of Amazigh cinema by identifying the elements that constitute an Amazigh film.

The panel seeks participants who wish to examine:

  • The essence of the Amazigh film
  • National and international Amazigh festivals
  • Formal and informal networks of distribution
  • Diasporic filmmakers and audiences
  • Promoting (trans)national cinema

The deadline for the submission of paper abstracts to the panel organizer: May 30, 2018
Habiba Boumlik, Associate Professor, City University of New York, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


11

“New lives in new worlds – Refugees from the MENA region in their new environments”

Interdisciplinary Panel for Refugee Research

Call for papers for a panel proposal at the World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES) 2018, 16-22 July 2018, Sevilla (Spain)

Organiser: Katharina Kilian-Yasin, Pforzheim University (Germany)

Chair / Discussant: tba

The MENA region is the place of origin for a large number of refugees worldwide. Wherever and under whichever circumstances refugees arrive in their new environments, their lives are changed and they have to cope with new situations. Reciprocally, the arrival of refugees may also lead to changes in those environments.

The papers for this proposed panel shall investigate the transformations and changes that individuals, groups, and societies undergo in this situation of forced migration, shedding light on the implications of the specific situation of refugees from the MENA region, on coping strategies, challenges, problems and future perspectives.

The proposed panel aims at bringing together research from diverse disciplines, thereby encouraging an interdisciplinary discussion about the situation and context of refugees from the MENA region.

We welcome papers that address socio-cultural, psychological, legal, political, educational etc. issues in the field of refugees from the MENA region with diverse methodological approaches, no matter whether a research focus on a micro-, meso- or macro‑level of analysis is chosen.

Depending on the quality and number of submitted abstracts, one or more panel proposals (with minimum 4 contributions of 15 minutes` length each) will be submitted to the conference organizers.

Time schedule for submission

Deadline for abstract submission 30th October 2017
Acceptance / refusal notice 20th November
WOCMES conference registration By 30th November 2017*
Official submission of proposed panel Before 09th December 2017

*In case of acceptance of a paper to the panel proposal, the author(s) of the accepted papers must register with the conference organizers at http://wocmes2018seville.org/web/index.php/en/registration (and reconfirm this to the panel organizers) by the end of November 2017. The panel proposal with all individual abstracts can only be officially submitted if all panel participants are registered.

Please hand in your paper proposal in the form of a 300-400 word abstract with an appropriate title.

Proposals should be in English.

Please send your proposal via email simultaneously to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. until 30th November 2017.

Further information about WOCMES is available at:

http://wocmes2018seville.org/web/index.php/en/


10

The Intersection of Equine Culture and History in Europe Middle East and North Africa

Organizers: Gwyneth Talley (UCLA Anthropology) and Kathryn Renton (UCLA History)

The proposed panel invites papers addressing the intersecting points of horses and horse culture the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) with their European counterparts, through history and anthropology. Horses were invaluable in warfare, hunting, and diplomacy. Their breeding, training, and trappings generated legends about horse culture in the Mediterranean still influential to this day. While horses are no longer used in the same ways today as they were from the Middle Ages through the Early Modern period, people all over the MENA and Iberian regions continue to use and celebrate their horse cultures. Spain maintains a mounted police horse division, celebrates the horse through festivals in Jerez de la Frontera and Seville, and continues to use horses in mounted bullfighting. In Morocco, the Salon du Cheval is beginning to garner world renown as an exhibit of traditional Moroccan horsemanship (tbourida or fantasia). Horse racing, while slightly diminished due to political turmoil, continues in every country from Morocco to Lebanon. Princess Haya of Jordan, the former president of the International Equestrian Federation (FEI), strongly encouraged the expansion of the FEI, and brought in $150mil of commercial revenue to the federation, which oversees international horse events. Aside from the Arab contribution to equestrian sports, the five-year EU ban on exportation of horses from Egypt has greatly diminished the opportunities for horse breeders in the country, stifling the horse economy. In Jerusalem, horse shows have become a non-political way of sharing a love of horses in the conflict-riddled region. 

The horse in this region pervades almost every aspect of culture and history, but this panel asks: how did the contact between Arab and European cultures affect each other in terms of horse breeds, riding styles, equipment, and general knowledge. This panel will examine this interchange of equestrian cultures past and present. Papers focusing on single countries, regions or comparative studies examining multiple locales or countries are welcome, as are papers from any single or combined disciplinary perspectives. 

Authors are asked to submit a paper title, abstract (no more than 300 words), their professional or institutional affiliation, and contact information. Academic, non-academic, or other professional authors are invited to apply. In cases of co-authored works, only one submission (including the same information for each author) should be made. Papers will be accepted in English only. The deadline for abstract submissions is midnight 5 November 2017. You will be informed of the result by 10 November 2017.

If the proposal is accepted, you will be required to register with WOCMES by 15 November, 2017, although acceptance of the panel by WOCMES is not assured. Please consult the WOCMES website http://wocmes2018seville.org/web/index.php/en/ for further information about conference and registration procedures.

We look forward to receiving your proposal, which you should send to BOTH This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Please include WOCMES in the email title.

The organizers intend to publish the papers in a collective book, so strong preference will be given to authors/speakers who will subsequently be prepared to submit their papers by 30 September 2018.


9

“New lives in new worlds – Refugees from the MENA region in their new environments”

Interdisciplinary Panel for Refugee Research

Call for papers for a panel proposal at the World Congress for Middle Eastern Studies (WOCMES) 2018, 16-22 July 2018, Sevilla (Spain)

Organiser: Katharina Kilian-Yasin, Pforzheim University (Germany)

Chair / Discussant: tba

The MENA region is the place of origin for a large number of refugees worldwide. Wherever and under whichever circumstances refugees arrive in their new environments, their lives are changed and they have to cope with new situations. Reciprocally, the arrival of refugees may also lead to changes in those environments.

The papers for this proposed panel shall investigate the transformations and changes that individuals, groups, and societies undergo in this situation of forced migration, shedding light on the implications of the specific situation of refugees from the MENA region, on coping strategies, challenges, problems and future perspectives.

The proposed panel aims at bringing together research from diverse disciplines, thereby encouraging an interdisciplinary discussion about the situation and context of refugees from the MENA region.

We welcome papers that address socio-cultural, psychological, legal, political, educational etc. issues in the field of refugees from the MENA region with diverse methodological approaches, no matter whether a research focus on a micro-, meso- or macro‑level of analysis is chosen.

Depending on the quality and number of submitted abstracts, one or more panel proposals (with minimum 4 contributions of 15 minutes` length each) will be submitted to the conference organizers.

Time schedule for submission
Deadline for abstract submission 30th October 2017
Acceptance / refusal notice 20th November
WOCMES conference registration By 30th November 2017*
Official submission of proposed panel Before 09th December 2017


*In case of acceptance of a paper to the panel proposal, the author(s) of the accepted papers must register with the conference organizers at http://wocmes2018seville.org/web/index.php/en/registration (and reconfirm this to the panel organizers) by the end of November 2017. The panel proposal with all individual abstracts can only be officially submitted if all panel participants are registered.

Please hand in your paper proposal in the form of a 300-400 word abstract with an appropriate title.

Proposals should be in English.

Please send your proposal via email simultaneously to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. until 30th November 2017.

Further information about WOCMES is available at:

http://wocmes2018seville.org/web/index.php/en/


8

EWIC WOCMES July 16-20, 2018 Seville, Spain SUBMIT BY DEC 9, 2017

Sarah Gualtieri - Associate Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, History and Middle East Studies. University of Southern California
Zeina Zaatari: Research Director, Political Research Associates.
Suad Joseph: Distinguished Research Professor, Anthropology and Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, University of California, Davis
Annelies Moors: Professor of Anthropology and Sociology, University of Amsterdam
Elora Shehabuddin Associate Professor, Humanities and Political Science, Rice University.
Lawrence Pintak: Founding Dean and Professor, Edward R. Murrow College of Communication, Washington State University. Chief Executive Office, NWPR/TV
European journalists (Work with WOCMES Executive Committee on representation)


ROUNDTABLE Representing Muslim Women: Muslim Women and the Media

The past several years have witnessed a massive escalation of Islamophobia in the United States and Europe, with Muslim women often the target of both physical and verbal attacks. No doubt some of this escalation has been related to violence described as terrorist attacks attributed to Muslim groups or individuals: the January 2015 Charlie Hebdo attack in Paris; the November 13, 2015 football stadium, theatre, and café attacks in Paris; the December 2, 2015 Inland Regional Center attack in San Bernardino, California; the March 22, 2016 bombings in the Brussels, Belgium airport and metro; the July 14, 2016 truck driver attack in Nice, France; the July 22, 2016 attacks in a shopping mall in Munich; the November 28, 2016 Ohio State University car ramming; and the December 19, 2016 Berlin, Germany, truck ramming -- for example. However, no small measure of this escalated Islamophobia, as will be discussed in the roundtable, can be attributed to the heightened hate-speech directed towards Muslims in recent political elections in the United States and Europe.
The roundtable addresses the problematic representation of Muslim women in USA and European print news media and other media platforms. We bring together leading scholars of women and Islamic cultures and key journalists and media practitioners into an open engaged conversation on transforming representation. The media is often the most powerful vehicle of Islamophobia. Journalists who write misrepresentative or misinformed articles and convey the often distorted images can become the propagators of discriminatory discourse directed at Muslims (often elided with Arabs and South Asians). Disproportionally, Islamophobic discourse and representation – as well as Islamophobic hate crimes -- have targeted Muslim women. This Roundtable emerges from a project which brings together leading experts on women and Islamic cultures (editors of the highly respected Encyclopedia of Women and Islamic Cultures) and leading journalists and faculty from the United States, Europe, and the Middle East to train young journalism and communications graduate students in the diverse and global histories and cultures of women and Islam. The goal of that project and this Roundtable is to shift the reporting, representations, and public discourses related to Islamic cultures and Muslim women. The project team is committed to the principle that knowledge is power; to the recognition that the media are powerful molders of public opinion; and to the deep belief that evidence/facts/truth, when presented by respected public agents, can generate healthy public debates and constructively transform public discourses. The Roundtable creates a space for scholars and media professionals to engage in such a conversation.

If you are interested in participating: please contact: Suad Joseph, Distinguished Research Professor
University of California, Davis. http://sjoseph.ucdavis.edu. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


7

THE MAGHREB STUDIES ASSOCIATION PANEL ON

THEME: COLONIAL HERITAGE IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND THE MAGHREB: THE SHAPING OF HOPES AND PERSPECTIVES

The aim of this conference is to examine how European colonialism and great power rivalry in the Middle East and North Africa have shaped the perspectives of the peoples in these countries and their hopes for their future. Besides the European powers that established their colonial hegemony in these countries, the conference will also deal with the influence of countries, such as the United States of America and Germany, which extended their influence through diplomacy, financial and military aid, and education.

The chronological framework of the conference extends from the mid-eighteenth century, when the political leaders of the countries of the Middle East and North Africa became aware of the Europeans’ economic and military ascendency, through the building of European colonial empires in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, to the collapse at first of the western European colonial empires towards the middle of the twentieth century and then of the Soviet ‘empire’ late in this century.

This theme, then, should invite original papers dealing with various aspects of the question of how colonial rule, and its demise, has shaped the perceptions of one another held by the colonial powers and the colonised peoples of the Middle East and North Africa. They should also deal, besides the influence the colonial structures had on the political systems that emerged in these countries, with debates and conflicts that came to the fore in them in the post-colonial period. Special significance should be given to the means by which Muslims affirmed in this period their attachment to Islamic norms and pride in Islamic civilisation, and the challenge they posed to the creation of western systems of government in their counties. Related to this issue is the Westerners’ fear that the presence of growing numbers of Muslims in their countries would lead to the intrusion of Islamic political and family norms in their societies. An equally significant issue that should be dealt with is the prospect of the replacement of the authoritarian regimes that emerged in the countries of the Middle East and North Africa in the post-colonial period by truly democratic systems of government that promote the rule of law, freedom of discussion and the emergence of civil societies.

We hope to include up to 4 presentations each lasting 15 minutes.

Proposal submission and Abstracts: The deadline for the submission of proposals and abstracts, which should be no more than 150 words, is 8 March 2018.
All applicants will be told whether or not their proposal has been accepted by 20 April 2018.

Abstracts can be submitted by email in Word format. Submissions should be emailed to

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

NOTE:

(1)  Priority will be given to paid-up Members of The Maghreb Studies Association;
(2)  If your proposal is selected, The Maghreb Studies Association will re-imburse €80.00 (covering part

of your conference registration cost) – this will be given to you at the conference.
(3)  It is our intention to arrange a dinner for our speakers along with other invited guests from the

WOCMES conference.
Proceedings of the conference: The organisers intend to publish the papers presented on our panels at this conference in The Maghreb Review, so strong preference will be given to authors/speakers who will subsequently be prepared to submit their papers by 30 September 2018.

Language: The conference will be in English or French


6

THE MAGHREB REVIEW P ANEL ON THEME: STATE AND SOCIETY IN THE MAGHREB

The North African region provides a rather unique setting for observing the interaction between State and Society, with one side facing the highly organised State systems of the Mediterranean, and another the vast — and largely stateless — expanses in the Sahara. In between are numerous pockets of rugged mountains where effective State control was only intermittently felt. These juxtapositions have been a powerful force throughout North African history.

In the colonial period, North Africa offered striking comparisons between two distinct models of the relationship between State and Society, the Islamic and French (along with derivative Spanish and Italian models). And in the post-colonial period, North Africa offers important insights on the impact of burgeoning revenues from oil, gas and phosphate exports, controlled by the central State, upon communities, many with a long experience of resistance to State control.

This theme, then, should invite a wide range of papers from a good many different disciplines on such topics as:

1. The history of State building movements — Almoravides, Almohads, Fatimids, etc.

2. Problems in the relationship between State and Society in the pre-colonial period as illustrated by:

a)  problems of military organisation and recruitment;
b)  taxation;
c)  legal policy;
d)  the State’s role in urban society and economy;
e)  religious policy; relations between State and religious leaders;
f)  non-State local institutions for maintenance of order.

3. Changes in State-Society relationships introduced by indigenous reformists and colonial administrations, particularly in: — law, medicine, local administration, education.

4. The role of the national State: — social services, family affairs, urban planning, agrarian reform and rural development, labour emigration/immigration, the role and rights of women, intellectual and cultural affairs.
We hope to include up to 4 presentations each lasting 15 minutes.

Proposal submission and Abstracts: The deadline for the submission of proposals and abstracts, which should be no more than 150 words, is 8 March 2018.
All applicants will be told whether or not their proposal has been accepted by 20 April 2018.

Abstracts can be submitted by email in Word format. Submissions should be emailed to

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

NOTE:

(1)  Priority will be given to paid-up Members of The Maghreb Studies Association;
(2)  If your proposal is selected, The Maghreb Studies Association will re-imburse €80.00 (covering part

of your conference registration cost) – this will be given to you at the conference.
(3)  It is our intention to arrange a dinner for our speakers along with other invited guests from the

WOCMES conference.
Proceedings of the conference: The organisers intend to publish the papers presented on our panels at this conference in The Maghreb Review, so strong preference will be given to authors/speakers who will subsequently be prepared to submit their papers by 30 September 2018.

Language: The conference will be in English or French


5

The ‘Resistance Axis’ and the Syria Conflict: Losses, Gains and New Trajectories?

Organisers: Robert Mason PhD, Director, Middle East Studies, American University in Cairo (AUC)

Discussant: TBC

The Syria conflict is in its 6th year, and has led to the deaths of more than 250,000 civilians, compromised global norms governing the use of chemical weapons, and contributed to deterioration in the relations between the U.S. and Russia. It has also led to the reconfiguration of the ‘resistance axis’ of Syria, Iran/Quds Force, Hamas and Hezbollah from a historic focus on countering Israel and the U.S. policies in the Middle East to projecting power into a conflict of vital importance to Syria and Iran’s “strategic depth” from its relationship with Hezbollah, and in maintaining or bolstering their influence in the Levant and broader Middle East.

This proposed panel addresses the so-called ‘resistance axis’ during the Syria conflict and the consequences of the conflict on each actor’s legitimacy, security and policies. It recognizes the loss of Hamas from the alliance and assesses such reconfigurations, including Russian intervention in support of the Syrian regime, on longer term prospects for the alliance.    

We welcome papers that deal with any aspect of these actors’ engagement in the conflict, other foreign intervention that may be relevant, and constraints on the Syrian, Iranian government and Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) policies, especially new perspectives and insights on the motivations, deployments and outcomes of the alliance. We also welcome papers that deal with the domestic Syrian situation, from ISIS to the armed opposition and civilian forces aiming to carve out a niche of representation in a wartime environment that has led to successive diplomatic tracks which do not favor their participation.  

  • Paper proposals must include a title and a 300-400 word abstract
  • Proposals should be in English
  • Deadline for submission: 30 November 2017
  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Further information is available at http://wocmes2018seville.org/web/index.php/en/

4

Panel

Halāl Enterprise in and beyond the Middle East

Halal or shari’a compliant goods (food and beverage, clothing/fashion, cosmetics) and services (hospitality, tourism, insurance, investment and financial services) have become a significant and a distinctive sector of business and economic activity in and beyond the Middle East, encompassing Muslim majority and minority societies alike. In addition to direct and indirect economic contributions (employment, tax receipts, capital growth, domestic and cross border investment) the halāl economy resonates with religious, cultural, societal and in some instances governmental or political significance.

This panel will examine the history, present and future of the halāl economy and the enterprises, products and services that populate it. Papers focusing on single countries, regions or comparative studies examining multiple locales or countries are welcome, as are papers from any single or combined disciplinary perspective. Empirical papers and those with quantitative or field data as well as theoretical papers will be considered. Proposals with linkages to the theme of WOCMES 2018, and the Three Cultures of the Mediterranean are especially welcome.

Authors are asked to submit a paper title, abstract (150 words), their professional or institutional affiliation and contact information. Both academic and non-academic or other professional authors (for example from law, accounting or business) are invited to apply. In cases of co-authored works, only one submission (including the same information for each author) should be made. Papers will be accepted in English only. The deadline for abstract submissions is midnight Tuesday 31 October 2017. You will be informed of the result by Friday 3 November 2017.

If the proposal is accepted you will be required to register with WOCMES by 15 November, although acceptance of the panel by WOCMES is not assured. Please consult the WOCMES websites http://www.tresculturas.org/wocmes18/ and http://wocmes2018seville.org for further information about conference and registration procedures.

We look forward to receiving your proposal which you should send to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


3

Panel

Neoliberal and Postmodern Urban Re-Configurations in the Middle East and North Africa

Organisers: Christian Steiner (Katholische Universität Eichstätt) and Steffen Wippel (Philipps-Universität Marburg)

Urban development in the MENA region has been complex and multifaceted in the last decade. Following the Dubai model of urban development, fast-track urban growth has greatly reshaped many cities in Arab Gulf countries despite severe temporary setbacks following the global financial crisis. Investments in cultural, sports, educational and business districts, hyperreal shopping and leisure facilities, huge waterfront developments and iconic mega-projects have aimed at broadening the economic basis for the post-oil era in these countries. Concurrently, they are intended as tools for city branding in a globalized competition of places and as signs to demonstrate progress and modernization to the members of the Gulf societies themselves. In consequence, these urban development projects function as a nucleus to (re-)develop urban and national identity, but also serve to legitimate the existing political system. However, comparatively unrecognized urban development in North Africa and the Levant has been turbulent and dynamic, too, and has been partly influenced by the upheavals of the “Arab Spring”.

What all these developmental paths seem to have in common is not only a postmodern, but also a neoliberal foundation: the privatization of urban functions, the erosion of public spaces, a strict consumption and business orientation and the securitization of urban spaces meet opaque planning processes.

Although the outcomes of these urban policies set a bright, clean and fascinating stage for development, they simultaneously imply typical “side effects”: increasing socio-economic fragmentation, displacement of populations, rising ethnical and cultural segregation, unequal access to urban infrastructure, incidents of political unrest and social counter-movements and increasing surveillance and political suppression.

Against this background, the panel intends to bring together presentations that critically tackle these complex current urban re-configurations and disparate developmental paths and that are based on conceptually well-informed, field-based research from a broad array of disciplines. Besides widely present “global cities”, this also includes less-investigated “secondary cities” that nevertheless undergo much the same experiences.

Authors are asked to submit a title, a short abstract (150 words maximum) and information about their institutional affiliation and contact. Please clearly indicate the research question and the concepts and empirical material your research will be based on. Papers will be accepted in English only.

The deadline for abstract submissions is 15 October 2017.

Depending on the number of accepted papers, we will propose either a single panel (with four participants) or a series of panels with several sessions. We ask all accepted participants to register with the conference organizers (and reconfirm this to the panel organizers) by late November 2017. Please note that all participants must be registered before we can proceed to officially submit the panel including individual abstracts.

Please consult the WOCMES websites http://www.tresculturas.org/wocmes18/ and http://wocmes2018seville.org for further information about the conference and registration procedures.

Proposals should be sent simultaneously to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


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This proposed panel invites papers addressing representations of the Palestinian question widely defined outside Palestine/Israel. Advocacy for Palestine has had considerable impact on the Palestinian diasporas and their allies across Europe, the Americas, and elsewhere. Whereas BDS received some attention in terms of the movement’s strides and challenges, the impact of the Palestine question on the diasporas’ identity development, organizational and communal life, and overall acculturation is now attracting sociohistorical scholarship. In addition, Palestine has been prominent in mahjar literature for several generations. In the U.S., for example, Arab American identity development was tied to early advocacy for Palestine as a core Arab cause, therefore hastening the need for belonging and political engagement before WWII. The scholarship is beginning to analyze the historical content of literary modules on Palestine in the writings of seminal diaspora poets among them Ameen Rihani, Elia Abu-Madi (Madey), and Mikhail Naimy. Scholars are also anchoring Palestine in deeper Arab national narratives and are beginning to show interest in the lives of early advocates during the Ottoman period when Palestine was part of a vision for Geographic Syria.
This panel aims at creating a conversation about Palestine's representations in primary and formal affiliations, assessments of whether advocacy for Palestine on any level enhances or lessens communal and organizational cohesion in any historical period. We also welcome narratives, prose, and chronicles where Palestine informed discourses, or shaped personal experiences.

Organiser:

Hani J. Bawardi, PhD
Associate Professor of History
Principal Faculty, Arab American Studies
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Deadline for submission: October 30th, 3017


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The Italian Society for Middle Eastern Studies (SeSaMO) http://www.sesamoitalia.it/sesamo-wocmes-2018/

  • Battling through the Press: Progressive Activism in the Middle East. Convenors: Patrizia Manduchi (Università di Cagliari), Daniela Melfa (Universitàdi Catania).
  • Playing on the Move: Understanding Play, Care and Migration through Inter-Relationality. Convenors: Estella Carpi (University College London and Save the Children UK), Chiara Diana (IREMAM-CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université).
  • Sociological perspectives on international migration in the GCC countries. Convenor: Gennaro Errichiello (Loughborough University, UK).
  • The First World War through Arab Eyes. Convenors:Maria Avino (Università di Napoli “L’Orientale”), Paola Viviani (Università della Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”).
  • The Making of the Washington Consensus in the Middle East and North Africa. Negotiating international assets, debts and power (1979-91). Convenor: Massimiliano Trentin (Università di Bologna).
  • Three Coasts, One Language: Trends in Arabic Linguistic Studies in the Islamic West (al-Andalus, Sicily, North Africa). Convenors: Francesco Binaghi (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3), Cristina La Rosa (Università di Catania).

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